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HUGHES 29 PROJECTS (RESTORATION AND UPDATING)
BOW  CORE REPAIR
Because of the anchor tube (starboard side) water had penetrated into the core and it became soft. No rot just wet and spongy. The anchor tube and the water fill hole were filled and the deck was drilled and the core removed.  Thickened epoxy was injected in the holes and the deck was prepped for painting.  the water fill hole will be drilled later when a new stainless fitting is obtained. The stanchion base holes where also filled and re-drilled as they were sloppy.
Bow surface area was finished and painted.  The anti skid will be repainted on later when the rest of it is done.  The bow pulpit was sent out and it had the bases re-aligned to the angle of the deck. Navigation light plates were attached which braced and strengthened the pulpit.  Rings where also attached for lifelines or other things.  A mounting plate was made and installed for the forward down tubes with and ring for a mounting point for a removable inner forestay to be installed.  Also used for a whisker pole downhaul.
ANCHOR ROLLER MODIFICATION
The original anchor roller was part of the bow stem plate and was also made from cast aluminium. Any force put on it would bend the complete roller assembly so it was cut off.  A double anchor roller was made by Stainless Outfitters in Barrie, Ontario and was mounted on the bow of Lady Hamilton. The assembly was designed so that the mounting holes where not visible from the inside v-berth area.  The orange ball is the marker for the anchor and trip line in case the anchor gets fouled.
SUMLOG REMOVAL AND HULL REPAIR
Removed the Sumlog knot meter and filled the 5 holes in the bilge / keel area on the starboard side.
RUDDER MODIFICATION (TO REDUCE HEEL INDUCED WEATHER HELM)
On the Hughes 29 weather helm increases with the amount of heel until you run out of rudder. 10 degrees of heel is good with weather helm increasing rapidly as the heel angle increases. A great deal of research into rudder design boiled down to it's simplest (I did not quite understand everything), indicated that approx 15 to 17 % of the rudder area should be forward of the axis line for rudders without a skeg. I added approximately 8% to give a total of 11% area.  The addition is made up of laminated wood with epoxy and then shaped to near the original rudder shape. The addition seemed to have eliminated about 75% of the force needed on the tiller leaving a safe amount of weather helm.  I could have gone larger but I am satisfied with the results. A rudder which is straight up and down instead of slanted back as with the newer designs would have been the best.  I did not want to make a complete new rudder. (2009)
FINISHED RUDDER

The extension worked so good at eliminating most of the heel induced weather helm I decided to finish off the extension and blend it in for a more smoother front edge.  This little extension also added a small amount more to the total area forward of the axis. (completed 2010)
  
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